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dc.creatorDurante, Federica
dc.creatorFiske, Susan T.
dc.creatorKervyn, Nicolas
dc.creatorCuddy, Amy J. C.
dc.creatorAkande, Adebowale (Debo)
dc.creatorAdetoun, Bolanle E.
dc.creatorAdewuyi, Modupe F.
dc.creatorTserere, Magdeline M.
dc.creatorAl Ramiah, Ananthi
dc.creatorMastor, Khairul Anwar
dc.creatorBarlow, Fiona Kate
dc.creatorBonn, Gregory
dc.creatorTafarodi, Romin W.
dc.creatorBosak, Janine
dc.creatorCairns, Ed
dc.creatorDoherty, Claire
dc.creatorCapozza, Dora
dc.creatorChandran, Anjana
dc.creatorChryssochoou, Xenia
dc.creatorIatridis, Tilemachos
dc.creatorContreras, Juan Manuel
dc.creatorCosta-Lopes, Rui
dc.creatorGonzález, Roberto
dc.creatorLewis, Janet I.
dc.creatorTushabe, Gerald
dc.creatorLeyens, Jacques-Philippe
dc.creatorMayorga, Renée
dc.creatorRouhana, Nadim N.
dc.creatorSmith Castro, Vanessa
dc.creatorStorari, Chiara C.
dc.creatorPérez Sánchez, Rolando
dc.creatorRodríguez Bailón, Rosa
dc.creatorMoya, Miguel
dc.creatorMorales Marente, Elena
dc.creatorPalacios Gálvez, Marisol
dc.creatorSibley, Chris G.
dc.creatorAsbrock, Frank
dc.creatorStorari, Chiara C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-20T17:06:16Z
dc.date.available2021-05-20T17:06:16Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn2044-8309
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/83505
dc.description.abstractIncome inequality undermines societies: The more inequality, the more health problems, social tensions, and the lower social mobility, trust, life expectancy. Given people’s tendency to legitimate existing social arrangements, the stereotype content model (SCM) argues that ambivalence―perceiving many groups as either warm or competent, but not both―may help maintain socio-economic disparities. The association between stereo- type ambivalence and income inequality in 37 cross-national samples from Europe, the Americas, Oceania, Asia, and Africa investigates how groups’ overall warmth-compe- tence, status-competence, and competition-warmth correlations vary across societies, and whether these variations associate with income inequality (Gini index). More unequal societies report more ambivalent stereotypes, whereas more equal ones dislike competitive groups and do not necessarily respect them as competent. Unequal societies may need ambivalence for system stability: Income inequality compensates groups with partially positive social images.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceBritish Journal of Psychology. Vol. 52es_ES
dc.titleNations’ income inequality predicts ambivalence in stereotype content: How societies mind the gapes_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doiDOI:10.1111/bjso.12005
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas (IIP)es_ES


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