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dc.creatorMata Jiménez, Leonardo
dc.creatorAchí Araya, María Rosario
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T17:03:09Z
dc.date.available2016-01-04T17:03:09Z
dc.date.issued1986
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.casinapioiv.va/content/dam/accademia/pdf/sv61pas.pdfes_ES
dc.identifier.isbn88-7761-002-6
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/15384
dc.descriptionArtículo científico -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud, 1986es_ES
dc.description.abstractCoccidian parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium cause acute diarrhea in many vertebrates, including man. Recent reviews on the subject [1-5] were stimulated by demonstration of a chronic, debilitating and generally fatal diarrhea in immunodeficient and immunosuppressed individuals, and in persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) [6-16]. Additional interest arose after finding that cryptosporidiosis is not rare among immunocompetent or otherwise healthy children and adults, who suffer from acute diarrheal disease in industrialized and less developed countries [17, 18]. The first Cryptosporidium species (C. muris) was described by Tyzzer in 1907 [19], who found the parasite in gastric glands of the domestic mouse. Tyzzer described oocysts measuring 5-6 x7 pm, with 4 sporozoites of about 12-14 p.m after excystation [19, 20]. He attempted transmission of the coccidium to the white rat, without success. Later, Tyzzer described another species, C. parvum, with considerably smaller oocysts measuring 3.0-3.3 X 4.0-4.5 p.m; excisted sporozoites measured 5.5-6.0 p.m [21]. This species was found in the small intestine of the laboratory mouse, rabbit and chicken [33], Cryptosporidium is currently placed in Apicomplexa, Sporozoea, Coccidia, Eucoccidiida, Eimeriina, and Cryptosporidiidae [22]. Many years after description of these species, additional "species" were named according to the vertebrate hosts in which they were found [22]. Most authors regard these species unjustified for several reasons. Oocysts found in different vertebrates are of similar size and morphology as those of C. parvum [23]. Infection and cross-infection occurs with oocysts of C. parvum-like strains in several vertebrate species and in man. Antibodies to one particular strain of Cryptosporidrum have been detected in sera from diverse vertebrate hosts [24]. On the basis of this information, one single species was proposed [24], in analogy with Toxoplasma, although one expert proposed one species for each of the four groups of vertebrates harboring parasites [25].es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceThe Interaction of Parasitic Diseases and Nutrition. Chagas, C. & Keusch, T. (eds), Scripta Varia No. 61, Pontificia Academia of Scientiarvm: 169-184es_ES
dc.subjectCryptosporidiumes_ES
dc.subjectcoccidian parasitees_ES
dc.subjecthealth childrenes_ES
dc.subjectCosta Ricaes_ES
dc.subjectPublic healthes_ES
dc.subjectDiarrheaes_ES
dc.titleCryptosporidium diarrhea in costarican childrenes_ES
dc.typecapítulo de libroes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud (INISA)es_ES


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