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dc.creatorChaves Ramírez, Andrea
dc.creatorDolz, Gaby
dc.creatorIbarra Cerdeña, Carlos N.
dc.creatorNúñez Vega, Genuar Román
dc.creatorOrtíz Malavasi, Edgar
dc.creatorBernal Valle, Sofía
dc.creatorGutiérrez Espeleta, Gustavo A.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-04T13:22:44Z
dc.date.available2022-03-04T13:22:44Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-08
dc.identifier.citationhttps://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1475-2875
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/85950
dc.description.abstractBackground: In South and Central America, Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum, Plasmodium vivax, Plas- modium simium, and Plasmodium falciparum has been reported in New World primates (NWP). Specifically in Costa Rica, the presence of monkeys positive to P. malariae/P brasilianum has been identified in both captivity and in the wild. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of P. brasilianum, P. falciparum, and P. vivax, and the potential distribution of these parasites‐infecting NWP from Costa Rica. Methods: The locations with PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) positive results and bioclimatic predictors were used to construct ecological niche models based on a modelling environment that uses the Maxent algorithm, named kuenm, capable to manage diverse settings to better estimate the potential distributions and uncertainty indices of the potential distribution. Results: PCR analysis for the Plasmodium presence was conducted in 384 samples of four primates (Howler monkey [n = 130], White‐face monkey [n = 132], Squirrel monkey [n = 50], and red spider monkey [n = 72]), from across Costa Rica. Three Plasmodium species were detected in all primate species (P. falciparum, P. malariae/P. brasilianum, and P. vivax). Overall, the infection prevalence was 8.9%, but each Plasmodium species ranged 2.1–3.4%. The niche model approach showed that the Pacific and the Atlantic coastal regions of Costa Rica presented suitable climatic conditions for parasite infections. However, the central pacific coast has a more trustable prediction for malaria in primates. Conclusions: The results indicate that the regions with higher suitability for Plasmodium transmission in NWP coin‐ cide with regions where most human cases have been reported. These regions were also previously identified as areas with high suitability for vector species, suggesting that enzootic and epizootic cycles occur.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceMalaria Journal 21, artículo 17es_ES
dc.subjectMolecular diagnosises_ES
dc.subjectMaxentes_ES
dc.subjectNew World primatees_ES
dc.subjectNeotropices_ES
dc.subjectMALARIAes_ES
dc.subjectENFERMEDAD TROPICALes_ES
dc.titlePresence and potential distribution of malaria‑infected New World primates of Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12936-021-04036-y
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Básicas::Facultad de Ciencias::Escuela de Biologíaes_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto111-B0-657


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