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dc.creatorCalvete Chornet, Juan José
dc.creatorSanz, Libia
dc.creatorMora Obando, Diana
dc.creatorLomonte, Bruno
dc.creatorTanaka Azevedo, Anita Mitico
dc.creatorde Morais Zani, Karen
dc.creatorSantˈAnna, Sávio S.
dc.creatorCaldeira, Cleópatra A. S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-18T15:17:46Z
dc.date.available2021-05-18T15:17:46Z
dc.date.issued2021-04
dc.identifier.issn1470-8752
dc.identifier.issn0300-5127
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/83458
dc.description.abstractThis short essay pretends to make the reader reflect on the concept of biological mass and on the added value that the determination of this molecular property of a protein brings to the interpretation of evolutionary and translational snake venomics research. Starting from the premise that the amino acid sequence is the most distinctive primary molecular characteristics of any protein, the thesis underlying the first part of this essay is that the isotopic distribution of a protein's molecular mass serves to unambiguously differentiate it from any other of an organism's proteome. In the second part of the essay, we discuss examples of collaborative projects among our laboratories, where mass profiling of snake venom PLA2 across conspecific populations played a key role revealing dispersal routes that determined the current phylogeographic pattern of the species.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipMinisterio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades/[BFU2017-89103-P]/MICIU/Españaes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceBiochemical Society Transactions, vol.49(2), pp.1027-1037es_ES
dc.subjectBiological mass spectrometryes_ES
dc.subjectSnake venomes_ES
dc.subjectVenomicses_ES
dc.titleWhat’s in a masses_ES
dc.typecontribución a revistaes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1042/BST20210288
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP)es_ES


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