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dc.creatorPrevidelli, Ágatha Nogueira
dc.creatorGómez Salas, Georgina
dc.creatorKovalskys, Irina
dc.creatorFisberg, Mauro
dc.creatorCortés Sanabria, Lilia Yadira
dc.creatorPareja, Rossina Gabriela
dc.creatorLiria Dominguez, María Reyna
dc.creatorYépez García, Martha Cecilia
dc.creatorHerrera Cuenca, Marianella
dc.creatorRigotti, Attilio
dc.creatorGuajardo, Viviana
dc.creatorZalcman Zimberg, Ioná
dc.creatorMurillo Solís, Ana Gabriela
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-15T14:46:48Z
dc.date.available2021-01-15T14:46:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-08
dc.identifier.citationhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0271531718310054es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0271-5317
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/82335
dc.description.abstractUnderreporting and overreporting of energy intake (EI) have been recognized as potential sources of bias. Dietary data mainly rely on proxy respondents, but little is known about the determinants of misreporting of EI among Latin American (LA) populations. This study was conducted using data from the multicenter Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health that consisted of information about sociodemographics, physical activity, and dietary intake from 9218 individuals aged 15 to 65 years who were living in urban areas in 8 LA countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela). Goldberg methodology was applied to classify the participants into categories of overreporter (OR), plausible reporter (PR), or underreporter (UR) of EI. Associations between misreporting and covariates were examined by the Kruskal-Wallis test, logistic regression, and linear regression. The prevalence of UR was 12.1% and OR was 14.1%. Costa Rica had the highest percentage of UR (24.4%) and the lowest of OR (7.3%), and Colombia had the lowest of UR (5.7%) and the highest of OR (22.4%). Furthermore, underreporters were more likely to be females from older groups with minimal education, white, physically active, overweight or obese, and living in Costa Rica. Overreporters were more likely to be younger, single, of low socioeconomic level, nonwhite, physically active, underweight or with normal weight, and from Colombia. The results demonstrated that sex, age, race, education status, and nationality seemed to influence the reporting behavior, which is essential to correctly interpreting potentially biased associations between diet and health outcomes, and improving nutritional interventions and public health policies.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe ELANS was supported by a scientific grant from the Coca Cola Company and support from the Instituto Pensi/Hospital Infantil Sabara, International Life Science Institute of Argentina, Universidad de Costa Rica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Universidad Central de Venezuela (CENDES-UCV)/Fundación Bengoa, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, and Instituto de Investigación Nutricional de Peru.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceNutrition Research, 2019, 68:9-18es_ES
dc.subjectIngesta energéticaes_ES
dc.subjectEncuesta de consumo de alimentoses_ES
dc.subjectNutriciónes_ES
dc.titlePrevalence and determinants of misreporting of energy intake among Latin American populations: results from ELANS Studyes_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nutres.2019.05.007
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Salud::Facultad de Medicina::Escuela de Medicinaes_ES


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