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dc.creatorRojas Carvajal, Mijail
dc.creatorVillalobos Cortés, Katherine
dc.creatorFornaguera Trías, Jaime
dc.creatorBrenes Sáenz, Juan Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T17:22:28Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T17:22:28Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/81739
dc.description.abstractGrooming is a widespread behavior in the animal kingdom primarily geared towards the care of the body surface; nonetheless, other behavioral functions have been investigated and postulated. For example, rodents display high levels of grooming in contexts of potential threat, a fact usually interpreted as a sign of stress and anxiety. Conversely, new evidence suggests that during the process of habituation to novel and threatening contexts, particular sequences of grooming would act as a behavioral feedback facilitating emotional de-arousal. To test those opposing hypotheses about grooming interpretation, we assessed how testing contexts with different gradients of familiarity would affect exploratory activity and risk-assessment behaviors, and grooming subtypes of stressed and non-stressed rats. For that purpose, different groups of male Wistar rats were tested in one of the follow conditions: (1) in an unfamiliar open-field arena, (2) in a familiar open-field arena, (3) and in a home cage. Prior to the 20-minutes testing session, half of the animals within each testing condition were stressed by receiving three foot shocks of 1 mA 5 seconds apart. If grooming indicates stress and anxiety, it should increase at the beginning of tests, with stressed rats displaying even higher levels of grooming as compared with their non-stressed counterparts. However, if grooming facilitates emotional de-arousal, it should increase as exploration and risk-assessment decrease. In such scenario, unstressed animals tested in the familiar contexts should display the greater levels of grooming, in contrast to pre-stressed animals tested in unfamiliar contexts. Evidence will be presented about how the degree of novelty and threat associated with the testing context, may modulate defensive behaviors after an acute stress. Furthermore, the detailed analysis of the kinetic changes in grooming sequences will provide new insights into the understanding of grooming and its informative value in preclinical research. We propose that the richness of grooming interpretation lies in the careful analysis of its sub-components over time. Here, we will bring new evidence that support the hypothesis that long and complex sequences of grooming would facilitate emotional de-arousal, whereas short and head-directed sequences would be more related with ongoing stress states.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.source27th Annual Meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society, Boca Raton, FL, EEUUes_ES
dc.subjectStresses_ES
dc.subjectgroominges_ES
dc.subjectanimal modelses_ES
dc.subjectarousales_ES
dc.subjecthabituationes_ES
dc.titleBehavioral changes across novelty habituation: Contextual modulation of self-grooming after a stress eventes_ES
dc.typepóster de congresoes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Centro de Investigación en Neurociencias (CIN)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Instituto de Investigaciones Psicológicas (IIP)es_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Salud::Facultad de Medicina::Escuela de Medicinaes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Básicas::Facultad de Ciencias::Escuela de Biologíaes_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto837-B8-123


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