Show simple item record

dc.creatorCascante Marín, Alfredo
dc.creatorNúñez Hidalgo, Stephanie María
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-29T20:40:29Z
dc.date.available2024-02-29T20:40:29Z
dc.date.issued2024-02
dc.identifier.citationhttps://academic.oup.com/aobpla/advance-article/doi/10.1093/aobpla/plae011/7614189es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2041-2851
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/90993
dc.description.abstractPlants with specialized pollination systems frequently exhibit adaptations for self-pollination, and this contradictory situation has been explained in terms of the reproductive assurance function of selfing. In the Neotropics, several plant lineages rely on specialized vertebrate pollinators for sexual reproduction, including the highly diverse Bromeliaceae family, which also displays a propensity for selfing. Thus far, the scarce evidence on the role of selfing in bromeliads and in other neotropical plant groups is inconclusive. To provide insights into the evolution and persistence of self-fertilization in the breeding systems of Bromeliaceae, we studied four sympatric epiphytic species from the genus Werauhia (Tillandsioideae) in Costa Rica. We documented their floral biology, pollination ecology, and breeding systems. We estimated the contribution of selfing by comparing the reproductive success between emasculated flowers requiring pollinator visits and unmanipulated flowers capable of selfing and exposed to open pollination across two flowering seasons. The studied species displayed specialized pollination by nectar-feeding bats as well as a high selfing ability (autofertility index values > 0.53), which was attained by a delayed selfing mechanism. Fruit set from natural cross-pollination was low (<26% in both years) and suggested limited pollinator visitation. In line with this, we found a very low bat visitation to flowers using video-camera recording, from 0 to 0.24 visits per plant per night. On the contrary, the contribution of selfing was comparatively significant since 54-80% of the fruit set from unmanipulated flowers can be attributed to autonomous self-pollination. We concluded that inadequate cross-pollination services diminished the reproductive success of the studied Werauhia, which was compensated for by a delayed selfing mechanism. The low negative effects of inbreeding on seed set and germination likely reinforce the persistence of selfing in this bromeliad group. These results suggest that selfing in bat-pollinated bromeliads may have evolved as a response to pollinator limitation.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.sourceAoB Plantses_ES
dc.subjectBreeding systemses_ES
dc.subjectBromeliaceaees_ES
dc.subjectChiropterophilyes_ES
dc.subjectCOSTA RICAes_ES
dc.subjectPollinator limitationes_ES
dc.subjectReproductive assurancees_ES
dc.titleSelfing in epiphytic bromeliads compensates for the limited pollination services provided by nectarivorous bats in a neotropical montane forestes_ES
dc.typeartículo originales_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aobpla/plae011
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Docencia::Ciencias Básicas::Facultad de Ciencias::Escuela de Biologíaes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Ecología Tropical (CIBET)es_ES
dc.identifier.codproyecto111-C0-060


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record