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dc.creatorEscalante Muñoz, Teresa
dc.creatorRucavado Romero, Alexandra
dc.creatorPinto, Antonio F. M.
dc.creatorTerra, Renata M. S.
dc.creatorGutiérrez, José María
dc.creatorFox, Jay W.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-06T17:19:39Z
dc.date.available2016-12-06T17:19:39Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/pr900489mes_ES
dc.identifier.issn1535-3907
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10669/29350
dc.description.abstractIn light of the complexity of wound tissue, proteomic analysis may not clearly reveal the nature of the wound or the processes involved in healing. However, exudate associated with wounds may provide a “window” on cellular events leading to the development of the wound and/or its healing. In this investigation we performed proteomic analysis on wound exudates from muscular wounds in mice caused by two very different types of snake venom toxins: BaP1, a snake venom metalloproteinase and Mtx-I, a snake venom phospholipase A2. Proteomic analysis of the exudates associated with these wounds clearly differentiated them and offered new perspectives on functional mechanisms by which these toxins cause tissue damage. In the case of wounds caused by the metalloproteinase, there was evidence of degradation of nonfibrillar collagens whereas the phospholipase wound exudate was noted by the presence of fibrillar collagen type I, apolipoproteins A-I, A-IV, and E, and fibronectin. These results suggest that the hemorrhage caused by snake venom metalloproteinases may be associated with the degradation of specific extracellular matrix proteins which play a role in matrix/capillary stabilization and that release of apolipoproteins from their complexes may be involved with the dysfunctional hemostatsis observed following snake envenoming.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[741-A7-502]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[741-A7-604]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Science/[F/4096-1]/IFS/Sueciaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNetwork for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases in Central America/[2-N-2008]/NeTropica/Sueciaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Virginia School of Medicine///Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceJournal Proteome Research. Volumen 8, Número 11. 2009es_ES
dc.subjectApolipoproteinses_ES
dc.subjectBasement membraneses_ES
dc.subjectExtracellular matrixes_ES
dc.subjectMyonecrosises_ES
dc.subjectNon-fibrillar collagenses_ES
dc.subjectPhospholipases A2es_ES
dc.subjectSnake venom metalloproteinasees_ES
dc.subjectSVMPses_ES
dc.subjectWound exudatees_ES
dc.subjectSnake venomes_ES
dc.titleWound exudate as a proteomic window to reveal different mechanisms of tissue damage by snake venom toxinses_ES
dc.typeartículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/pr900489m
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP)es_ES


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