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dc.creatorRosabal Coto, Guillermo
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-05T21:48:41Z
dc.date.available2020-02-05T21:48:41Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationhttp://act.maydaygroup.org/act-18-3-rosabal-coto/es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1545-4517
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/80475
dc.description.abstractThis special issue is framed conceptually and contextually, and expands on the theorization undertaken by authors from a North-South border perspective. In the first section, I explain foundational decolonial terms, while I suggest political meanings and implications of the rising interest in decolonization in music education scholarship. In the following section, I discuss practical challenges brought by Western-based ontology and epistemology in music socialization, from my particular border position as colonized/colonizer. I close the article with a call for decolonization for music education practitioners, and researchers in both the global North and South.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica/[]/UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Toronto/[]/UofT/Estados Unidoses_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceAction, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, vol. 18(3), pp.1-24es_ES
dc.subjectColonialityes_ES
dc.subjectDecolonizationes_ES
dc.subjectInner colonialismes_ES
dc.subjectMusic educationes_ES
dc.subjectMusic socializationes_ES
dc.subjectColonialidades_ES
dc.subjectDescolonizaciónes_ES
dc.subjectColonalismo internoes_ES
dc.subjectEducación musicales_ES
dc.subjectSocialización musicales_ES
dc.titleThe Day after Music Educationes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.22176/act18.3.1
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Artes y Letras::Instituto de Investigaciones en Arte (IIArte)es_ES


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