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dc.creatorChollett, Iliana
dc.creatorCollin, Rachel
dc.creatorBastidas, Carolina
dc.creatorCróquer, Aldo
dc.creatorGayle, Peter M. H.
dc.creatorJordán Dahlgren, Eric
dc.creatorPatterson, Heather M.
dc.creatorKoltes, Karen H.
dc.creatorOxenford, Hazel A.
dc.creatorRodríguez Ramírez, Alberto
dc.creatorWeil, Ernesto
dc.creatorAlemu I., Jahson B.
dc.creatorBone, David
dc.creatorBuchan, Kenneth C.
dc.creatorCreary Ford, Marcia
dc.creatorEscalante Mancera, Edgar
dc.creatorGarzón Ferreira, Jaime
dc.creatorGuzmán Espinal, Héctor M.
dc.creatorKjerfve, Björn
dc.creatorKlein Salas, Eduardo
dc.creatorMcCoy, Croy
dc.creatorPotts, Arthur C.
dc.creatorRuíz Rentería, Francisco
dc.creatorSmith, Struan R.
dc.creatorTschirky, John J.
dc.creatorCortés Núñez, Jorge
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-16T17:25:59Z
dc.date.available2019-05-16T17:25:59Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationhttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0188564es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/77120
dc.description.abstractCoastal ecosystems and the livelihoods they support are threatened by stressors acting at global and local scales. Here we used the data produced by the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity program (CARICOMP), the longest, largest monitoring program in the wider Caribbean, to evidence local-scale (decreases in water quality) and global-scale (increases in temperature) stressors across the basin. Trend analyses showed that visibility decreased at 42% of the stations, indicating that local-scale chronic stressors are widespread. On the other hand, only 18% of the stations showed increases in water temperature that would be expected from global warming, partially reflecting the limits in detecting trends due to inherent natural variability of temperature data. Decreases in visibility were associated with increased human density. However, this link can be decoupled by environmental factors, with conditions that increase the flush of water, dampening the effects of human influence. Besides documenting environmental stressors throughout the basin, our results can be used to inform future monitoring programs, if the desire is to identify stations that provide early warning signals of anthropogenic impacts. All CARICOMP environmental data are now available, providing an invaluable baseline that can be used to strengthen research, conservation, and management of coastal ecosystems in the Caribbean basin.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourcePLoS ONE, vol.12(12), e0188564es_ES
dc.subjectCoral reefses_ES
dc.subjectMangrove swampses_ES
dc.subjectWater qualityes_ES
dc.subjectCaribbeanes_ES
dc.subjectCoastal ecosystemses_ES
dc.subjectOcean temperaturees_ES
dc.subjectOceanses_ES
dc.subjectMarine ecosystemses_ES
dc.subject577.781 636 5 Ecología a lo largo de la costaes_ES
dc.titleWidespread local chronic stressors in Caribbean coastal habitatses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.date.updated2019-04-12T21:53:07Z
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0188564
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Básicas::Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (CIMAR)es_ES


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