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dc.creatorMoncada Jiménez, José
dc.creatorPlaisance, Eric Paul
dc.creatorAraya Ramírez, Felipe
dc.creatorTaylor, James K.
dc.creatorRatcliff, Lance
dc.creatorMestek, Michael L.
dc.creatorGrandjean, Peter Walter
dc.creatorAragón Vargas, Luis Fernando
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-19T16:32:40Z
dc.date.available2018-06-19T16:32:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-01
dc.identifier.citationhttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/doaj/0860021x/2010/00000027/00000002/art00007es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0860-021X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/74945
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to compare the acute hepatic response to diet modification and exercise-induced endotoxemia, and to determine if associations exist between liver damage markers, body core temperature, and IL-6 responses to a laboratory-based duathlon. Eleven moderately-trained healthy males followed a low-carbohydrate (CHO) and a high CHO diet to change their glycogen stores two-days before completing a duathlon. Blood samples were obtained at rest, immediately after and 1- and 2-h following the duathlon for determination of endotoxin-lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LPS-LBP) complex, IL-6, and liver integrity markers AST, ALT, and AST/ALT ratio. Hydration status and body core temperature were assessed at rest, during, and after the duathlon. Athletes were more dehydrated and had higher AST/ALT ratios in the lowcompared to the high-CHO diet trial regardless of the measurement time (p<0.05). IL-6 increased from resting to immediately after, 1- and 2-h following duathlon regardless of the diet (p<0.05). A higher LPS-LBP complex concentration was observed from rest to immediately after the duathlon. No significant correlations were found between LPS-LBP complex levels and body core temperature. In conclusion, athletes on a low-CHO diet showed higher hepatic structural damage and finished more dehydrated compared to athletes on a high-CHO diet. Body core temperature and LPS-LBP complex levels were unrelated beyond the increase in body core temperature explained by exercise. No significant associations were found between body core temperature, IL-6 and LPS-LBP complex concentrations.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.sourceBiology of Sport, Vol 27(2), pp. 111-118es_ES
dc.subjecthumanes_ES
dc.subjectcytokineses_ES
dc.subjectlipopolysaccharidees_ES
dc.subjectinfammationes_ES
dc.subjectexercisees_ES
dc.subjecthumanoes_ES
dc.subjectcitocinases_ES
dc.subjectlipopolisacáridoes_ES
dc.subjectejercicioes_ES
dc.subjectinflamaciónes_ES
dc.subject796.607 8 Ciclismo y actividades relacionadases_ES
dc.titleAcute Hepatic Response to Diet Modification and Exercise-induced Endotoxemia during a Laboratory-based Duathlones_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Movimiento Humano (CIMOHU)es_ES


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional