Show simple item record

dc.creatorChaves Mora, Fernando
dc.creatorChuang, Ting-Wu
dc.creatorSasa Marín, Mahmood
dc.creatorGutiérrez, José María
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-08T20:05:25Z
dc.date.available2017-06-08T20:05:25Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-11
dc.identifier.citationhttp://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/8/e1500249qes_ES
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/30070
dc.description.abstractSnakebites are environmental and occupational health hazards that mainly affect rural populations worldwide. The ectothermic nature of snakes raises the issue of how climate change’s impact on snake ecology could influence the incidence of snakebites in humans in ways that echo the increased predation pressure of snakes on their prey. We thus ask whether snakebites reported in Costa Rica from 2005 to 2013 were associated with meteorological fluctuations. We emphasize El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a climatic phenomenon associated with cycles of other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the region and elsewhere. We ask how spatial heterogeneity in snakebites and poverty are associated, given the importance of the latter for NTDs. We found that periodicity in snakebites reflects snake reproductive phenology and is associated with ENSO. Snakebites are more likely to occur at high temperatures and may be significantly reduced after the rainy season. Nevertheless, snakebites cluster in Costa Rican areas with the heaviest rainfall, increase with poverty indicators, and decrease with altitude. Altogether, our results suggest that snakebites might vary as a result of climate change.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica//UCR/Costa Ricaes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipTaiwan Ministry of Science and Technology/[NSC 102-2314-B-038-049-MY2]//Taiwánes_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipNagasaki University/[Program for Nurturing Global Leaders in Tropical and Emerging Communicable Diseases]//Japónes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 3.0 Costa Rica*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/cr/*
dc.sourceSciences Advances; Volumen 1, Número 8, 2015es_ES
dc.subjectBothrops asperes_ES
dc.subjectAntivenomses_ES
dc.subjectClimate changees_ES
dc.subjectEctothermes_ES
dc.subjectPopulation cycleses_ES
dc.titleSnakebites are associated with poverty, weather fluctuations, and El Niñoes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.1500249
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto Clodomiro Picado (ICP)es_ES
dc.identifier.pmid26601254
dc.identifier.pmidPMC4643785


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Atribución-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 3.0 Costa Rica
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Atribución-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 3.0 Costa Rica