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dc.creatorRosero Bixby, Luis
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-06T17:51:56Z
dc.date.available2016-12-06T17:51:56Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/3115257es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1728-4457
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/29353
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the rationale and sources of support for population programs is crucial for assessing their impact and chances of survival. One of the most notable features of population agencies and programs is that not long ago—in the 1950s—they were unthinkable. "To govern is to populate" was the unquestioned principle of good government attributed to Juan Bautista Alberdi, the nineteenth-century statesman and philosopher from Argentina. How did governments come to abandon this principle and establish birth control programs (later called euphemistically "family planning" and "reproductive health" programs)? The answer "rapid population growth" or "high demographic density" may seem obvious to demographers but it is not so obvious for politicians, especially considering the opposition to birth control by religious authorities and other powerful interest groups and the nationalist pride associated with large populations.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourcePopulation and Development Review; Volumen 27, Número: Global Fertility Transition. 2001es_ES
dc.subjectFecundidades_ES
dc.subjectCrecimiento Demográficoes_ES
dc.subjectModelo de Simulaciónes_ES
dc.subjectSalud públicaes_ES
dc.titleComment: Population Programs and Fertilityes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias Sociales::Centro Centroamericano de Población (CCP)es_ES


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