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dc.creatorMarsh, W. W.
dc.creatorHentges, D. J.
dc.creatorChavarría Milanés, José Fernando
dc.creatorThal, W. R.
dc.creatorAdams, M. K.
dc.creatorAchí Araya, María Rosario
dc.creatorMata Jiménez, Leonardoes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-07T16:31:35Z
dc.date.available2015-08-07T16:31:35Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.citationhttp://www.microbecolhealthdis.net/index.php/mehd/article/view/7491/8835es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1651-2235
dc.identifier.issn0891-060X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10669/15180
dc.descriptionArtículo científico -- Universidad de Costa Rica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud. 1990es_ES
dc.description.abstractFaecal specimens were collected from infants and children with common infections who presented to the Paediatrics Outpatient Department of the National Children's Hospital, San Jose, Costa Rica or to the Paediatrics Clinic, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas. Specimens were obtained before administration of various antibiotics, 7 d after therapy was begun and 28 d after completion of treatment. The antibiotics prescribed were either amoxicillin, ampicillirt, cephalexin, choramphenicol, dicloxocillin, erythromycin, penicillin or trimethroprim/ sulphamethoxazole. Faecal concentrations of total and individual volatile fatty acids (VFA) and faecal pH levels were determined and compared before, during and after treatment with the various antibiotics. Specimens, collected during the same time periods from a group of healthy infants and children who were not taking antibiotics, were evaluated to determine if normal fluctuations occurred between samplings. There were no significant differences in the Texas subjects in total VFA concentrations and pH levels between the patients receiving antibiotics and healthy participants who did not. With the exception of erythromycin administered to Costa Rican patients, therapeutic doses of the antibiotics did not significantly alter total VFA concentrations or pH levels of the faeces. Variations in concentrations of individual VFAs as a consequence of treatment were demonstrated only in Costa Rican patients teceiving either erythromycin or cephalexin; however, the patterns of change were similar to those observed in untreated control participants from Texas and were therefore not attibuted to antibiotic administration. These results are in accordance with our previous studies which show that absorbable antibiotics, administered to mice in therapeutic doses, do not significantly alter total VFA concentrations or pH levels of caecal contents and do not increase the susceptibility of the animals to oral challenge with enteric pathogens.' We speculate that the use of absorbable antibiotics does not compromise natural resistance against infections of the intestinal tract of humans.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipTexas Tech University Health Sciences Centeres_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipHospital Nacional de Niños, Costa Rica.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversidad de Costa Rica, Instituto de Investigaciones en Saludes_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.sourceMicrobial Ecology in Health and Disease 3(1): 7-13es_ES
dc.subjectCosta Ricaes_ES
dc.subjectantibioticses_ES
dc.subjectfaecal pHes_ES
dc.subjectvolatile fatty acid concentrationses_ES
dc.subjectinfantses_ES
dc.subjectyoung childrenes_ES
dc.subjectvolatile fatty acids (VFA)es_ES
dc.subjectSalud públicaes_ES
dc.subjectChild developmentes_ES
dc.titleInfluence of Orally Administered Antibiotics on Faecal pH and Volatile Fatty Acid Concentrations on Infants and Young Childrenes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.typeArtículo científicoes_ES
dc.description.procedenceUCR::Vicerrectoría de Investigación::Unidades de Investigación::Ciencias de la Salud::Instituto de Investigaciones en Salud (INISA)es_ES


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